Places to Visit in Istanbul

The former capital of three successive empires, Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman, Istanbul today honours and preserves the legacy of its past while looking forward to a modern future.Its variety is one of Istanbul’s greatest attractions: The ancient mosques, palaces, museums and bazaars reflect its diverse history.
Istanbul is the commercial, historical and cultural pulse of Turkey, and its beauty lies in its ability to embrace its contradictions.: ancient and modern, religious and secular, Asia and Europe, mystical and earthly all co-exist here. Istanbul Old City area (Sultanahmet) area is the first place in Turkey which was listed as a World Heritage Site by Unesco.
Istanbul offers so many things to visit and see, but we will try to highlight them for you below:

Hagia Sophia Museum

Hagia Sophia Museum
Hagia Sophia is the one of the most visited museums and most prominent monuments in the world in terms of art and the history of architecture. It has also been called “the eighth wonder of the world” by East Roman Philon as far back as the 6th century. The current Hagia Sophia is...
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The Blue Mosque

The Blue Mosque
One of the most famous monuments of Turkish and Islamic art, The Blue Mosque ( Sultanahmet Camii) is visited almost by everyone who comes to Istanbul. Built between 1609-1616, the mosque used to be part of a large complex, including a covered bazaar, Turkish baths, public kitchens, a hospital, schools, a...
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Topkapi Palace

Topkapi Palace
Topkapi Palace was not only the residence of the Ottoman sultans, but also the administrative and educational center of Ottoman Empire. Initially constructed between 1460 and 1478 by Sultan Mehmed II, the conqueror of Constantinople, and expanded upon and altered many times throughout its long history, the palace served as the home of the...
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Chora Church

Chora Church
The Turkish word “Kariye” is derived from the ancient Greek word “Chora” meaning outside of the city (land). It is known that there was a chapel outside of the city before the 5th century when the city walls were erected. The first Chora Church was rebuilt by Justinianus (527-565) in place of...
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The Basilica Cistern

The Basilica Cistern
The Basilica Cistern was built during the reign of Justinian I (527-565) to supply water to the palaces in the vicinity. There are 336 columns and these columns are arranged in 12 rows of 28 each. The cistern measures 140 by 70 meters. The columns are topped with capitals, some of them plain, but...
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Dolmabahce Palace

Dolmabahce Palace
The Dolmabahce Palace, a blend of various European architectural styles, was built between 1843-1856 by Karabet Balyan, the court architect of Sultan Abdulmecid. The Ottoman sultans had many palaces in all ages, but the Topkapi was the official residence until the completion of the Dolmabahce Palace. The three-storied...
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The Hippodrome

The Hippodrome
The square in front of The Blue Mosque, Hippodrome was one of the most famous areas in Byzantine Constantinople. The original Hippodrome was constructed in 200 AD. by Emperor Septimus Severus.The Hippodrome was the heart of the civil activities. Propaganda activities, rebellions, fights and eventually chariot races took place in this area. The Hippodrome...
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The Bosporus

The Bosporus
The Bosporus or Bosphorus, also known as the Istanbul Strait, (Turkish: Bogaz or Bogazici) is a strait that forms the boundary between the European part (Rumelia) of Turkey and its Asian part (Anatolia). Its English name comes from a Greek legend: Zeushad an affair with a beautiful women named Io. When...
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The Galata Tower

The Galata Tower
It was called the Christea Turris (Tower of Christ) by the Genoese and the Megalos Pyrgos (The Great Tower) by the Byzantines. It took its present shape during the Genoese period. The Tower was heavily damaged during an earthquake in 1509, and it was...
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