Places To Visit in Ephesus

In the 1st century, Ephesus was home to a staggering 250,000 people, but its origins are found by excavators to go back as far as 6000 BC. As the largest city in the Mediterranean at that time, it was known for its structures such as the Temple of Artemis (even though it remained uncompleted until approximately 550 BC) and the site of the Gladiator’s Graveyard.
Ephesus was a formidable city, having survived the Cimmerian attacks around 650 BC, the Greco-Persian Wars, and the victory of Alexander the Great.
In the early 1300’s, the city fell under Seljuk rule and flourished for some time, building new structures such as the Turkish bathhouses, and the Isa Bey Mosque. In 1402 BC, the city was restored to the Turkmen Beylicks only to be abandoned within the century.
The Temple of Artemis met its fate at the hands of angry Christian citizens in 401 AD. An earthquake in 614 AD further reduced the city to the ruins we see today.

Ephesus Ancient City

Ephesus Ancient City
Some sources say that the city was founded by the Amazons in the 3rd millenium BC. The Amazons were a race of woman warriors who lived in Anatolia. We see the mention of Amazons in the epic of Iliad and Odyssey by Homer. According to Epic of Odyssey, Amazons fought with the Trojans against the Mycenaeans and Spartans in the...
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The House Of Virgin Mary

The House Of Virgin Mary
The Virgin Mary’s house was unusually discovered by Sister Anne Catherine Emmerich, a German nun in the year 1812. Sister Emmerich awoke one day, with visions and stigma that actually included St. John and the Virgin Mary travelling from the place of Jerusalem to the land of Ephesus. She was able to describe it in...
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Pergamon Ancient City

Pergamon Ancient City
Pergamon also known as Pergamum was an ancient city founded by colonists on the Aegean coast of Anatolia at the site of the present day city of Bergama. First inhabitance dates back to 8th century BC. Unlike many cities in the Aegean first inhabitants were not Greeks in this city. In the era following the...
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Sirince Village

Sirince Village
Sirince once was a Greek Orthodox village, 7 Miles away from Ancient city of Ephesus(current Selcuk town) and 20 miles away from Kusadasi. Sirince was once called Cirkince (ugly). The name is especially chosen to dis-attract people to move to the village. First foundation of the village dates back to...
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The Basilica Of Saint John

The Basilica Of Saint John
It is believed that the evangelist St. John had spent his last years in the region around Ephesus and buried in the southern slope of Ayosolug Hill. Three hundred years after the death of St. John, a small chapel was constructed over the grave in the 4th...
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Sardes Ancient City

Sardes Ancient City
Known biblically as the home of the church that received the fifth of letters to the seven churches in Revelation, Sardis was the capital of the Lydian empire and one of the greatest cities of the ancient world. Located on the banks of the Pactolus River, Sardis was 60...
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Priene Ancient City

Priene Ancient City
Priene is an ancient Greek city which lies between the popular holiday resorts of Kusadasi and Bodrum. It is one of many important ancient sites in the area and is close to both Miletus and Ephesus. Even though it is a very small city, the real charm of Priene lies in its quiet...
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Miletus Ancient City

Miletus Ancient City
Miletus played an important role in the history of western Anatolia as one of the 12 Ionian Cities of Asia Minor. The ruins of the ancient city are situated 30 km south of Soke near the Maeander (Buyuk Menderes) river and is one of the most attractive sites in Turkey....
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Didyma – Didymaion

Didyma – Didymaion
The Temple of Apollo at Didyma or Didymaion was the fourth largest temple in the ancient Greek world. The temple’s oracle, second in importance only to that at Delphi, played a significant role in the religious and political life of both Miletus and the greater Mediterranean world; many...
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